Posted on

Nutraceutical Distribution: What’s Right for Me?

Many practices have begun adding nutritional supplements to their patient protocols. Clinical research supports the effect that nutrition can have on eye health, but it’s still a major undertaking to bring nutraceuticals into the practice. There are so many ways to do this, it becomes almost paralyzing to try and sort through and find what option(s) works best for your practice.

Mile Brujic, OD, FAAO, took some of the legwork out for you and put together an analysis of the pros and cons of the most popular ways to offer nutraceuticals. Below are a few options,  along with the pros and cons of each. Continue reading Nutraceutical Distribution: What’s Right for Me?

Posted on

Prediabetes: What Does This Mean for ODs?

Diabetes and prediabetes can be scary for patients, but eye care professionals can offer proactive protection for eye health.As one of the leading causes of death in the US, diabetes is a terrifying subject. It’s a life-long health issue that requires a multitude of health care professionals to be involved, including eye care professionals. Ideally, we would keep everyone from developing diabetes, but identifying it early and intervening is key in warding off any ill effects. Continue reading Prediabetes: What Does This Mean for ODs?

Posted on

An Innovation in Nutritional Protection

90% of US adults spend 2+ hours a day on screens.The amount of time the average American spends on screens doesn’t seem to be slowing down or stopping any time soon. 90% of American adults use a digital device for 2+ hours a day, and 70% use 2 or more devices at a time. Society has become accustomed to screens, and many of us don’t consider what this artificial light source could be doing to our eyes, especially at such a short distance. Luckily, EyePromise® is thinking about that. Continue reading An Innovation in Nutritional Protection

Posted on

More Screen Time = Tired Eyes – But Patients May Not Know That

Tired eyes can be a common complaint in those who spend hours on digital screens.Eye care professionals have recently seen an increase in reports of asthenopia, or tired eyes, potentially in association with the increase of digital device use. Many patients may not associate this symptom with increased device usage. An article written in Review of Optometry explains that there’s confusion around “tired eyes” and digital devices that can be shown in the number of different terms used to refer to it: eye strain, computer vision syndrome, and digital eye strain. Continue reading More Screen Time = Tired Eyes – But Patients May Not Know That

Posted on

Parents’ Concerns About Screen Time Continue to Grow

Screen time is an increasing concern for parents and healthcare professionals alike.Screen time is a hot topic for many people, whether it’s doctors, educators, or parents. While options for helping reduce screen time continue to increase, so does the concern parents have regarding their children screen use. Vision Monday recently shared survey results detailing what concerns parents most about screen time use, specifically for their teens. Continue reading Parents’ Concerns About Screen Time Continue to Grow

Posted on

National Nutrition Month & Occasional Dry Eye

March is National Nutrition Month, and this can mean different things for different people. For some, it means eating better to improve their overall health. It means getting more or less of a specific ingredient for others. When it comes to people with occasional dry eye, it means getting the right group of nutrients that can relieve their daily struggles and symptoms. As a sports-registered dietitian, Chrissy Barth knows the importance of nutrition, and she learned how effective a high-quality nutritional supplement can be for her occasional dry eye. Continue reading National Nutrition Month & Occasional Dry Eye

Posted on

How Proactive Can You Be with Eye Care?

EyePromise Screen Shield Teen helps naturally defend children's eyes from the effects of screen time.EyePromise® is heavily focused on the importance of nutrition and proactive eye care. Catching eye health concerns and beginning care early always leads to better patient outcomes. Nutrition is an important piece of most if not all early care plans, but how early can eye care professionals begin nutritional intervention? With EyePromise Screen Shield™ Teen, the answer is as young as 4 years old. Continue reading How Proactive Can You Be with Eye Care?

Posted on

A New Way to Look at Age-Related Eye Health Concerns

The growing number of Americans over 50 means that more people are at risk for age-related eye health concerns.Age-related eye health concerns are an increasing problem in the US. With an aging population, the number of patients coming through eye care practices that have a risk for or have developed age-related eye health concerns continues to grow. According to the National Eye Institute, the number of Americans suffering from these concerns will have grown to 3.66 million, almost a 60% increase from 2010. That number is projected to increase to just under 5.5 million by 2050. Continue reading A New Way to Look at Age-Related Eye Health Concerns

Posted on

What to Know About Resveratrol

Research discovers new compounds every day, and resveratrol benefits are still being investigated.

The number of nutrients in the world are nearly infinite. It seems like every other day, researchers discover another vitamin, mineral, antioxidant, chemical, etc. with possible benefits and side effects. One of the newer discoveries in our lifetimes is resveratrol, and its effects are still being researched. Continue reading What to Know About Resveratrol

Posted on

Age-Related Eye Health: Proactive vs. Reactive Care

While declining vision may happen with age, age-related eye health concerns doesn't have to be a part of growing old.With an aging population, it’s important for eye care professionals to know the changes that occur throughout the years. Declining vision is a typical side effect of aging, with patients noticing changes between the ages of 40 and 60 years old. While declining vision may be unavoidable, Dr. Raymond Brill knows that age-related eye health concerns don’t have to be part of the picture. Continue reading Age-Related Eye Health: Proactive vs. Reactive Care