Posted on

Old Wives’ Tales About Vision

At some point in our lives, we’ve heard old wives’ tales about “dos and don’ts” that can make us wonder if there’s any truth to them. Vision is included on this list of superstitions.

 

 

 

 

 

1- Reading in the dark will cause long-term damage to your vision.

False: We’ve all been warned in our childhood to stop reading in the dark, or we run the risk of losing or damaging our vision. This is thankfully false! When you read in dim lighting, you may develop a headache or eye strain, but neither is permanent. Our advice – skip the headache and turn an extra light on while reading.

2- Eating carrots will improve your eyesight.

False: This old wives’ tale seems to be the most popular and widely believed. While carrots contain beta-carotene and Vitamin A (which are vital nutrients for retinal health), it doesn’t do much for improving vision. It can do the exact opposite if you take more than the right amount of these nutrients.

3-  If you cross your eyes on purpose, they can get stuck that way.

False: Your eyes will not stay in that position. They will naturally go back into place once you focus on something else.

4- You don’t have to wear sunglasses on cloudy days.

False: Your eyes are at risk of UV (Ultra-Violet) damage even on cloudy days. UV damage can cause an array of eye health issues. According to the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, 40–50% of total UV damage occurs before the age of 20, so make sure your children are wearing sunglasses as well!

5- Children with misaligned or crossed-eyes will “grow out” of these eye health issues.

False: These eye health conditions will not correct themselves over time. A doctor must be involved to force the eye into its correct place using patching, glasses, eye drops, or surgery if necessary. It’s recommended that these procedures be done when the child is still young.

 

A little knowledge helps us be the healthiest we can be!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *